AHS College Advising



College and Career Department                             

 

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AHS College Nights 2013- 2014

AHS College Night Handouts 2012- 2013

Junior College Night Handouts April 3, 2013


Agenda

  1. Welcome & Introductions
  2. Rachael Sands: The college visit and an overview of important websites and resources for college and career exploration. 
III. Elaine Ehlers: Overview of individual student meetings
IV. Kristi Good
  • Have a testing plan: taking both tests? Re-taking either? SAT subject tests?  Get your writing component.
  • Details about Colorado ACT
  • Drop-in test prep sessions
  • Upcoming test dates between now and Dec. 2013
  • Super scoring, sending scores, and multiple scores
  • Importance of test scores in application process.
  • Meet with Kristi if you want help interpreting your scores

V. Judy Rosenthal: Junior timeline, the college process, and terminology

VI.Senior Panelists: Aiyana Anderson, Ian Bowers, Lily Oswald, Carly Pierson, and Cooper Stowers
  • What was your favorite part of the college process? What was the most challenging? Why? How did you handle these situations?
  • Did you feel overwhelmed during the process? If so, when and how did you deal with it ?
  • If you were to do it again, what would you do differently ?
  • What advice would you give to a rising junior and their parents as to how to make the college process more streamlined ?
  • If you have made your final decision, how did you arrive at that conclusion? What factors helped you to eliminate your other options?

VII. Final Questions

THE COLLEGE PROCESS AND IT’S CONFUSING TERMINOLOGY
Yes, I want to GO to college, but what does that actually mean?
  1. What is college?
  2. What is the difference between a Liberal Arts College and a University?
  3. What about Engineering or Technological Colleges ?
  4. What about Professional Degree-Granting Schools ?
  5. Technical/Trade Schools
  6. Community/Junior Colleges
  7. Military Service Academies

What about ALL those tests !!!!


PLAN (part of the Educational Planning Assessment Program through the ACT)

This is a multiple-choice test designed to match the ACT. It measures English, math, reading and science reasoning skills. It was designed for college bound students in the 10th grade, and serves as a predictor of the ACT composite.


PSAT/NMSQT (Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test)

The PSAT is a multiple-choice test that measures verbal and mathematical reasoning. It is designed for 11th grade students and is given yearly in October. 10th graders who have completed geometry are also able to take this test, but strictly for practice only. The PSAT is a part of ETS (Educational Testing Service) which also develops the SAT I’s, SAT II’s, AP exams and the TOEFL.


ACT (American College Testing)

The ACT is a college entrance examination accepted by almost all four-year colleges and universities. It was designed to measure the level of achievement for students at the end of the 11th grade. The ACT has questions in four areas: English, mathematics (through trigonometry), reading comprehension and science reasoning. A composite score is given where the highest score is 36. There is also a writing component that is required by some institutions, the highest score is 12…(graded by 2 readers, each with the highest score of 6 allowed). All juniors take the state required ACT in April, but there is NO writing offered at the school administered test because that is not generally a national test date.


SAT I: (Scholastic Aptitude Test)

The SAT I is used for college admission and is accepted by almost all four-year colleges and universities in the U.S., as well as Canadian and European schools. The SAT I measures the students’ability in the areas of verbal and mathematical reasoning. The SAT I now has a writing component, the highest score on each test is 800, with the total perfect score of 2400. It is generally taken during the spring of the junior year and repeated again in the fall of the senior year.


SAT II: (SUBJECT TESTS)

The SAT II subject tests are one-hour, multiple choice tests in five general subject areas. English, History and Social Studies, Mathematics, Foreign Languages, and Science. Some colleges require SAT II’s for either admission and/or placement . Students should take these tests soon after the completion of the course that corresponds to the test.


TOEFL (TEST OF ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE)

This test is designed to measure the proficiency of the English language for a student whose native language is not English. The test consists of four parts, Listening comprehension, Structure and written expression, Vocabulary and reading comprehension, Writing an essay. This test should be taken during the junior year.


JUNIOR TIMELINE:SECOND SEMESTER


MARCH

LINK Internship: Enjoy, Learn, Observe, and have an incredible internship!


SPRING (APRIL-MAY)

  • Develop a preliminary list of colleges that interest you…write or call to request a prospectus and additional information
  • Keep your grades up !!!
  • Register for the SAT,ACT or SAT II’s…
  • Begin your College Search….a good source is Collegeboard.org…….or you could use Naviance
  • Plan to attend a College Fair
  • Evaluate how you are performing in your classes and think about what kinds of classes you would take as a senior
  • Plan for some college visits if possible…try to schedule them when the students are on the campus
  • When researching colleges keep in mind the following:
  • Size, Location….(distance from home), Urban, Suburban, or Rural, Public or Private, Liberal Arts or University, Coed or Single Sex, Religious Affiliation, Admission Requirements, Majors, Cost/Financial Aid, Athletic Programs, Campus Life
  • KEEP YOUR GRADES UP !!!
  • Make a list of teachers, counselors, employers and other adults who you might ask to write letters of recommendation for next year
  • Take the State required ACT test…April
  • Register for the June ACT and/or SAT I’s and/or SAT’II’s…if necessary
  • Meet with your counselor to discuss and help facilitate your college planning and search process


SPRING/SUMMER (MAY-AUGUST)

Complete any standardized tests…re-take if necessary

Research and visit colleges

Have a great summer…working, studying, volunteering, or traveling…whatever you are able to accomplish


APPLICATION TERMS TO KNOW

EARLY DECISION (ED):

The “early decision” program is a program in which a student receives early notification of a college admission decision.

The student must agree in advance to enroll in the college if he/she is accepted under the early decision process; this is a binding agreement. Students may apply early decision to only one college; it should be the student’s absolute first choice. Application deadlines for early decision are usually in early November, with decision letters mailed in mid-December. Students who are considering applying under the early decision plan should take all of their admission tests (ACT, SAT I, SAT II, TOEFL) by the end of their junior year.


EARLY ACTION (EA):

The “early action” program is designed to give students early notification of a college’s admission decision.

The “early action” plan does not require a prior commitment to enroll if accepted; it is not binding. Students may apply to more than one school under the early action plan. An applicant accepted under this plan has until May 1st, the candidate’s reply date, to respond to the offer of amission.


RESTRICTIVE EARLY ACTION (REA):

Restrictive “early action” is a program similar to regular early action, but it does restrict the number of schools to which an applicant can apply “early action”. It is also a program designed to give students an early notification of an admission decision.


REGULAR DECISION:

This is a regular program of application and admission. A student submits an application by a specific date and receives a decision in a clearly stated period of time; generally by mid-April.


ROLLING ADMISSION:

This is an application program whereby the student submits their application and the institutions review the applications as they are submitted, rendering decisions throughout the cycle.


OPEN ADMISSION:

This is a program of admission whereby any applicant with a high school diploma is accepted. Some state universities have this program, but it is usually limited to state residents. All community colleges have open admission.


WAITING LIST:

This is a list of students who are not initially accepted by an institution, but who may be later, depending on the number of accepted students who enroll. Most colleges ultimately accept very few of the students on the waiting list. Students are notified during the summer of their acceptance.


DEFERRED ADMISSION:

There is a distinct difference between a “wait-list” and a deferral. If your application gets deferred, it means that you have not been accepted yet, you might be later…..so what are you supposed to do with that?? If you have applied EA or ED then your application has been converted to a regular application. You will be reviewed again during the normal admission season with all the other applicants. However, you have been freed from any obligation to attend their school if accepted, since you were “deferred” during the “early” process. You can feel free to apply to as many other schools as you wish. If you have applied under the regular application deadlines, then perhaps the school wants to see more information before they make a final admission decision; your senior grades, additional test scores, or any other accomplishments that you may have achieved.



SENIOR COLLEGE APPLICATION CHECKLIST AND TIMELINE

Use this checklist as an organizational tool for your applications, deadlines and other student responsibilities:

FALL (SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER)

Finalize college list…approximately 6-8 schools representing Reach/Target/Safety

Request application forms….mainly available online…. college specific applications or use of the Common Application

Retake ACT, SAT, or SAT II’s if necessary

Decide which application deadline BEST applies to YOU: ED, EA, REA, REGULAR ADMISSION

Request official high school transcript to be sent

Send official SAT, SAT II, ACT SCORES

Request letters of recommendation……once letters are sent, then write thank you notes to appropriate teachers, individuals, etc.

Essays…..write essays, be sure to ANSWER THE QUESTION…..this  is the one opportunity for your “voice” to be heard…write the truth, from the heart, and follow the guidelines for each college

Proof your essays for spelling and grammar, have two additional people read your essays….have one person read the essay aloud to you…..so you can hear what you have said

Be sure to pay the application fee

Submit CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE if needed…..many private schools participate in the CSS Profile

ALWAYS PRINT OUT A COPY OF YOUR COMPLETED APPLICATION FOR YOUR RECPORDS…Keep a file for each school to which you have applied

Hit submit !!!!! Good luck!!!

WINTER  (DECEMBER-MARCH)

Request mid-year grade reports to be sent if required

If Interviews are required or recommended schedule them accordingly either at the college or with alumni

Send thank-you notes to interviewer(s)

Keep checking the status of your applications making sure that ALL materials have been received…keep track of your specific “pin” numbers for each school in your college files

If any additional information is requested, be sure to send it in a timely manner

Fill out the FAFSA …it cannot be completed or submitted until after January 1st 2013

Research and apply for any scholarships that pertain to you…FASTWEB.ORG ,FINAID.ORG, MERITAID.COM

Be aware of any PRIORITY Deadlines for Financial Aid and/or Scholarships…a Deadline is a Dead…Line !!!

KEEP YOUR GRADES UP……..YOU MUST BE THE SAME PERSON THAT APPLIED IN THE FALL…Colleges will and have rescinded their acceptances

SPRING  ( APRIL-MAY)

Begin to make final decisions about attendance

Visit colleges if necessary before making that final decision

The national student reply date is May 1st…..

Send in your deposit

Send your final transcript

Send letters or emails to schools that you have decided not to attend…thanking them for their offer of admission

CONGRATULATIONS………YOU HAVE DONE IT !!!!!

 

Junior College Timeline

JUNIOR YEAR TIMELINE

FALL (SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER)

Attend Junior Parent night….October 11th….5PM

Take PSAT….National Test Dates are: Wednesday, Oct. 17th and Saturday, Oct. 20th, 2012…this one counts for National Merit Scholarships

Work hard and keep your grades up

If you are having any difficulties in your classes be sure to see your teachers for help

Plan your standardized testing schedule SAT’S, SATII’S, ACT’S…you’ll need to register up to 6 weeks ahead of time

Sign up for SAT or ACT Prep courses if necessary

Develop a resume…a record of your accomplishments, activities, and work experience.

If you don’t participate in many activities outside of class, now is the time to get involved. Consider the things you like and would enjoy.

Begin investigating sources for financial aid….FASTWEB.ORG

Meet with your LINK Coordinator to investigate plans for your March Internships

WINTER (DECEMBER-FEBRUARY)

PSAT Scores will be arriving…review the results and begin to learn more about your strengths and weaknesses

Keep your grades up !!!

Register for the SAT,ACT or SAT II’s…

Begin your College Search….a good source is Collegeboard.org…….or you could use Naviance

Plan to attend a College Fair

Evaluate how you are performing in your classes and think about what kinds of classes you would take as a senior

Plan for some college visits if possible…try to schedule them when the students are on the campus

When researching colleges keep in mind the following:

Size, Location….(distance from home), Urban,  Suburban, or Rural, Public or Private, Liberal Arts or University, Coed or Single Sex, Religious Affiliation, Admission Requirements,  Majors, Cost/Financial Aid, Athletic Programs, Campus Life

LINK INTERNSHIP-MARCH

Enjoy, Learn, Observe, and have an incredible internship !

SPRING (APRIL-MAY)

Develop a preliminary list of colleges that interest you…write or call to request a viewbook and additional information

KEEP YOUR GRADES UP !!!

Make a list of teachers, counselors, employers and other adults who you might ask to write letters of recommendation for next year

Take the State required ACT test…April

Register for the June ACT and/or SAT I’s and/or  SAT’II’s…if necessary

Meet with your counselor to discuss and help facilitate  your college planning and search process

SPRING/SUMMER (MAY-AUGUST)

Complete any standardized tests…re-take if necessary

Research and visit colleges

Have a great summer…working, studying, volunteering, or traveling…whatever you are able to accomplish.


NINTH AND TENTH GRADE TIMELINE

FALL (SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER)

Attend 9th-10th grade parent night

For 9th graders….this is the beginning of your high school career and your transcript…it all starts here !

For 10th graders….understand what your transcript looks like and how your grades appear…what is the trend, what does this transcript say about you and your academic performance thus far?

Work hard and keep your grades up !!!

If you are having difficulty in your classes be sure to see your teachers for help…you must be an advocate for yourself !

If you are ready, as a 10th grader…you can take the PSAT just for practice…test your skills and see how you handle the testing situation

Get involved in some extra-curricular activities….make them meaningful and enjoyable

Make new friends, develop even better study habits, be responsible for yourself, have fun !!

Begin working on your ICAP…exploring possible careers and colleges……what happens after high school

Outline high school courses to take for the next three/four years

WINTER (DECEMBER-FEBRUARY)

PSAT scores will be arriving for those who have taken the test….review your scores and determine your strengths and weaknesses

Continue to work hard and keep your grades up !

If interested and ready, attend a College Fair for experience and exposure

Understand what classes are required for high school graduation and then admission to college, are you on the right track?

Begin thinking and researching summer enrichment programs, jobs, or volunteer opportunities

SPRING (MARCH-MAY)

Register for SAT’s, ACT’s, SAT II’s ONLY if applicable

Review course selection for next year

Continue to work hard and keep your grades up !

Finish the year strong !

SUMMER (JUNE-AUGUST)

Have a great summer !

Visit college campuses informally if possible

Start building your recommendation file

Research scholarships…FASTWEB.ORG

APPLICATION TERMS TO KNOW

EARLY DECISION (ED):

The “early decision” program is a program in which a student receives early notification of a college admission decision.

The student must agree in advance to enroll in the college if he/she is accepted under the early decision process; this is a binding agreement. Students may apply early decision to only one college; it should be the student’s absolute first choice. Application deadlines for early decision are usually in early November, with decision letters mailed in mid-December. Students who are considering applying under the early decision plan should take all of their admission tests (ACT, SAT I, SAT II, TOEFL) by the end of their junior year.

EARLY ACTION (EA):

The “early action” program is designed to give students early notification of a college’s admission decision.

The “early action” plan does not require a prior commitment to enroll if accepted; it is not binding. Students may apply to more than one school under the early action plan. An applicant accepted under this plan has until May 1st, the candidate’s reply date, to respond to the offer of amission.

RESTRICTIVE EARLY ACTION (REA):

Restrictive “early action” is a program similar to regular early action, but it does restrict the number of schools to which an applicant can apply “early action”. It is also a program designed to give students an early notification of an admission decision.

REGULAR DECISION:

This is a regular program of application and admission. A student submits an application by a specific date and receives a decision in a clearly stated period of time; generally by mid-April.

ROLLING ADMISSION:

This is an application program whereby the student submits their application and the institutions review the applications as they are submitted, rendering decisions throughout the cycle.

OPEN ADMISSION:

This is a program of admission whereby any applicant with a high school diploma is accepted. Some state universities have this program, but it is usually limited to state residents. All community colleges have open admission.

WAITING LIST:

This is a list of students who are not initially accepted by an institution, but who may be later, depending on the number of accepted students who enroll. Most colleges ultimately accept very few of the students on the waiting list. Students are notified during the summer of their acceptance.

THE COLLEGE PROCESS AND IT’S CONFUSING TERMINOLOGY

Yes, I want to GO to college, but what does that actually mean?

  1. What is college?
  2. What is the difference between a Liberal Arts College and a University?
  3. What about Engineering or Technological Colleges ?
  4. What about Professional Degree-Granting Schools ?
  5. Technical/Trade Schools
  6. Community/Junior Colleges
  7. Military Service Academies

What about ALL those tests !!!!

  1. PLAN (part of the Educational Planning Assessment Program through the ACT)

This is a multiple-choice test designed to match the ACT. It measures English, math, reading and science reasoning skills. It was designed for college bound students in the 10th grade, and serves as a predictor of the ACT composite.

  1. PSAT/NMSQT (Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test)

The PSAT is a multiple-choice test that measures verbal and mathematical reasoning. It is designed for 11th grade students and is given yearly in October. 10th graders who have completed geometry are also able to take this test, but strictly for practice only. The PSAT is a part of ETS (Educational Testing Service) which also develops the SAT I’s, SAT II’s, AP exams and the TOEFL.

  1. ACT (American College Testing)

The ACT is a college entrance examination accepted by almost all four-year colleges and universities. It was designed to measure the level of achievement for students at the end of the 11th grade. The ACT has questions in four areas: English, mathematics (through trigonometry), reading comprehension and science reasoning. A composite score is given where the highest score is 36. There is also a writing component that is required by some institutions, the highest score is 12…(graded by 2 readers, each with the highest score of 6 allowed). All juniors take the state required ACT in April, but there is NO writing offered at the school administered test because that is not generally a national test date.

  1. SAT I: (Scholastic Aptitude Test)

The SAT I is used for college admission and is accepted by almost all four-year colleges and universities in the U.S., as well as Canadian and European schools. The SAT I measures the students’ability in the areas of verbal and mathematical reasoning. The SAT I now has a writing component, the highest score on each test is 800, with the total perfect score of 2400. It is generally taken during the spring of the junior year and repeated again in the fall of the senior year.

  1. SAT II: (SUBJECT TESTS)

The SAT II subject tests are one-hour, multiple choice tests in five general subject areas. English, History and Social Studies, Mathematics, Foreign Languages, and Science. Some colleges require SAT II’s for either admission and/or placement . Students should take these tests soon after the completion of the course that corresponds to the test.

  1. TOEFL (TEST OF ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE)

This test is designed to measure the proficiency of the English language for a student whose native language is not English. The test consists of four parts, Listening comprehension, Structure and written expression, Vocabulary and reading comprehension, Writing an essay. This test should be taken during the junior year.


 Parent "Brag" Sheet

PARENT "BRAG" SHEET (This information is used by counselors/teachers for student recommendations.)

 

NAME OF STUDENT: .

 

1.What are your child’s outstanding accomplishments during the past three or four years? Why did you select these as most important?

 

2. In what areas has your child shown the most development and growth during the past three or four years?

 

3 . What do you consider to be his/her outstanding personality traits?

 

4. If you had to describe your son/daughter in five adjectives, what would they be?

 

5. Are there any unusual or personal circumstances that have affected your child’s educational or personal experiences?

 

 Please feel free to use a second sheet of paper if your comments do not fit into the space provided.

Parent Signature:

Counselor Signature: 

Counselor Request for More Information

Teacher: ______________________________________Date Needed: _____________________________________________

________________________________________________has asked me to write a letter of recommendation to/for____________________________________ . To provide a more complete picture of your student, I need your  assistance. Please briefly assess the student in the following areas.

 

Academic Achievement:

 

Character:

 

Personal Qualities:

 

Promise/Aptitude:

 

Maturity:

 

Integrity/Values:

 

Motivation:

 

Special Talents:

 

Please cite specific events and unusual circumstances whenever possible. Thank you for your help.

Return form to: Elaine Ehlers